Class HNLIInclusive

  • All Implemented Interfaces:
    java.util.Iterator<java.util.Vector<HTMLNode>>, java.util.ListIterator<java.util.Vector<HTMLNode>>

    public class HNLIInclusive
    extends AbstractHNLI<TagNode,​java.util.Vector<HTMLNode>>
    HNLIInclusive: HTMLNode List Iterator, Inclusive - Documentation.

    This interface builds on Java's interface ListIterator<E>, which itself is an extension of the interface java.util.Iterator<E>.

    This is an Iterator class that has been heavily improved to allow for all types of updates, additions, removals, etc... to a vectorized-html web-page. The methods that are provided allow a user to request an Iterator from the Inclusive Iterator retrieval classes in this Node-Search Package.

    The concept of 'Inclusive', as explained quite thoroughly in the classes that contain this word, 'Inclusive' means that in this here Iterator, sub-lists of (Vectors) of 'HTMLNode' will be returned from the nextElement() methods in this class. Each Vector or sublist of HTMLNode will begin with an opening HTML Element, for example '<DIV ...>' and end, the last element in the vector that's returned, will be an HTML Closing Element, for example '</DIV>'

    HNLIInclusive (Inclusive Iterator) Generator Class:



    public interface java.util.Iterator<E> has these methods:

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    // Performs the given action for each remaining element until all elements have been processed or the action throws an exception.
    default void	forEachRemaining(Consumer<? super E> action)
    
    // Returns true if the iteration has more elements.
    boolean hasNext()
    
    // Returns the next element in the iteration.
    E next()
    
    // Removes from the underlying collection the last element returned by this iterator (optional operation).
    default void remove()
    


    public interface java.util.ListIterator<E> extends the previous Iterator with these methods:

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    // Inserts the specified element into the list (optional operation).
    // IMPORTANT NOTE: The HTML Node-Search Engine implements this method slightly differently.  This method
    //                 performs an insert at the specified index of the last result returned by the iterator.
    //                 Java's JDK adds the nodes at the index that would be returned by a call to nextIndex().
    //                 This difference allows the programmer to analyze the last data returned in making the decision
    //                 to perform an insert / add operation.
    void	add(E e)
    
    // Returns true if this list iterator has more elements when traversing the list in the forward direction.
    boolean hasNext()
     
    // Returns true if this list iterator has more elements when traversing the list in the reverse direction.
    boolean hasPrevious()
    
    // Returns the next element in the list and advances the cursor position.
    E next()
    
    // Returns the index of the element that would be returned by a subsequent call to next().
    int nextIndex()
    
    // Returns the previous element in the list and moves the cursor position backwards.
    E previous()
    
    // Returns the index of the element that would be returned by a subsequent call to previous().
    int previousIndex()
    
    // Removes from the list the last element that was returned by next() or previous() (optional operation).
    void remove()
    
    // Replaces the last element returned by next() or previous() with the specified element (optional operation).
    void set(E e)
    


    NOTE: This Iterator class further extends Java's ListIterator<E> to add several HTMLNode and Vector<HTMLNode> specific insertion, deletion, and replacement operations. These methods are listed below in the 'Methods' section of this class documentation page.

    THE WISDOM OF AN ITERATOR: Generally, it is sometimes apparent that Java's introduction of the concept of generics - and particularly the Iterator<E> and ListIterator<E> has been somewhat down-played in some circles. The value of an Iterator is sometimes over-looked when applied to data-modification. 4 out of 6 of the static method-based class-types in this package: Find, Get, Peek, Count and Count provide only "data-observation" of the underlying vectorized-HTML. The other two Poll and Remove, however, modify the underlying Vector. All of these work fine without an using an Iterator, however, there may be cases where node-replacement and node-removal on a case-by-case basis will be necessary. And that can lead to problems caused by stale data pointers.

    STALE DATA POINTERS: If an array of index pointers is requested: int[] posArr = TagNodeFind.all(...) and the user begins replacing and removing nodes using this array... if at any point the size of the Vector is changed, the entire pointer-array will immediately contain stale-data! This can be overcome by maintaining a 'Vector-size delta' value, and offsetting each value in the pointer-array. Indeed, however, this is exactly what the HNLI and HNLIInclusive iterators do internally! If a programmer employs the set(...), add(...) and remove(...) methods provided by the Iterator-classes both in this package, and the java-interfaces they inherit, internally a size-delta and a cursor are maintained by the Iterator when & if elements are added, updated and removed. As long long as the underlying Vector is not modified by code outside of the Iterator methods, stale and invalid data-pointers will never be returned by the getter methods of this class. Index-Pointer Arrays are often useful, but less-so when the user plans on changing or adding sections of HTMLNode that change how many nodes are in the underlying Vector.



    • Method Detail

      • hasPrevious

        public boolean hasPrevious()
        Use this method to find out whether the underlying Vector and current cursor position would retrieve another match if 'previous' or 'previousIndex' were called.
        Returns:
        This shall return TRUE if calling the previous(), or previousIndex() methods would return another inclusive / sub-list node-match. This method shall return FALSE if calling previous() would generate / throw a 'NoSuchElementException' - because there are no more sub-list matches in the underlying Vector, given the current cursor position.
        Throws:
        java.util.ConcurrentModificationException - Internal to this Iterator's state, there is a private int 'expectedSize' maintained. If modifications are made to the underlying vectorized-html, from outside of the add(...), set(...) or remove(...) variants provided by this interface then the value of this internal-field int 'expectedSize' will not be consistent with the actual size of the Vector. When this situation arises, both class HNLI and also HNLIInclusive will throw a ConcurrentModificationException.

        NOTE: Changes to the underlying Vector that do not modify the size will simply not be detected. This is due to 'a bug' in the JDK implementation of AbstractList which keeps an integer-field named 'modCount' stored as 'protected' - and (unfortunately) unavailable to implementers of AbstractList (rendering it useless).

        ALSO: Any call made to a variant of the provided first(...) or last(...) methods will cause the internal int 'expected-size' field to reset. This would, therefore, prevent ConcurrentModificationException from throwing - even if code from outside the Iterator had modified the size of the underlying Vector.
        See Also:
        Util.Inclusive.subSectionOPT(Vector, int, int), TagNode.isClosing, SubSection
        Code:
        Exact Method Body:
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         CHECK_CME();
        
         if (hasPrevDP != null) return true;
        
         int LOOP_BOUNDARY = (minCursor == -1) ? 0 : minCursor;
        
         if (cursor == -1) cursor = LOOP_BOUNDARY;  // will return false
        
         while (--cursor >= LOOP_BOUNDARY)
             if ((hasPrevDP = TEST_CURSOR_INCLUSIVE()) != null)
                 return true;
        
         return false;
        
      • previous

        public java.util.Vector<HTMLNodeprevious()
        Returns the nearest sub-list match in the underlying Vector, given the current cursor position - when searching in the left-direction, or in the direction of decreasing Vector-indices.
        Returns:
        This shall return the sub-list match that is directly previous to the current cursor position.
        Throws:
        java.util.ConcurrentModificationException - Internal to this Iterator's state, there is a private int 'expectedSize' maintained. If modifications are made to the underlying vectorized-html, from outside of the add(...), set(...) or remove(...) variants provided by this interface then the value of this internal-field int 'expectedSize' will not be consistent with the actual size of the Vector. When this situation arises, both class HNLI and also HNLIInclusive will throw a ConcurrentModificationException.

        NOTE: Changes to the underlying Vector that do not modify the size will simply not be detected. This is due to 'a bug' in the JDK implementation of AbstractList which keeps an integer-field named 'modCount' stored as 'protected' - and (unfortunately) unavailable to implementers of AbstractList (rendering it useless).

        ALSO: Any call made to a variant of the provided first(...) or last(...) methods will cause the internal int 'expected-size' field to reset. This would, therefore, prevent ConcurrentModificationException from throwing - even if code from outside the Iterator had modified the size of the underlying Vector.
        java.util.NoSuchElementException - If there are not more matches, this exception shall throw. Avoid having to catch this exception by always calling method 'hasPrevious', and only invoking 'previous' if that method returned TRUE.
        Code:
        Exact Method Body:
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         return Util.cloneRange(v, previousDotPair());
        
      • previousDotPair

        public DotPair previousDotPair()
        This method, in-some-ways but-not-others, "overrides" the original ListIterator<E> public int previousIndex() method. Since public class HNLIInclusive is an Iterator over "sub-lists" - not individual nodes - this means that whenever a Vector-index position is expected, the programmer should be expecting this Iterator to return two values: both a sub-list start-position, and also a sublist ending-Vector-position. This is the purpose of class DotPair - it allows pointers (indices) rather than copies of the nodes themselves to be saved, copied or evaluated.

        NOTE: Java's public int 'previousIndex()' method requires that an integer be returned in order for this class to properly implement the public interface ListIterator<E>. This method, however, is offered as a "better substitution for" the original 'previousIndex' method. The original previousIndex() method in the ancestor interface ListIterator may still be used, but the actual intention (finding sublists matches in a vectorized-html webpage) could be misunderstood by a novice. Method previousIndex(), which is mandatory, will return an integer that points to the beginning index of the next sub-list match, but will (obviously) leave off the ending-position of the next sub-list match. Remember that the concept behind the key-word "Inclusive" is that a Vector-sublist shall searched, found, and returned, not just the first HTML Element TagNode found.

        SUMMARY OF ISSUE: The method previousDotPair() returns a value that is more-exactly in-line with the notion of an HTML Node List Iterator than the method previousIndex(). The latter will return an integer index-pointer (into the underlying vectorized-HTML page-Vector) that identifies the first element of the previous-match, but leave off completely information about where that sublist ends.
        Returns:
        The previous integer-pointer pair to the starting-index and ending-index of the previous "inclusive-sublist match" found on the vectorized-html webpage.
        Throws:
        java.util.ConcurrentModificationException - Internal to this Iterator's state, there is a private int 'expectedSize' maintained. If modifications are made to the underlying vectorized-html, from outside of the add(...), set(...) or remove(...) variants provided by this interface then the value of this internal-field int 'expectedSize' will not be consistent with the actual size of the Vector. When this situation arises, both class HNLI and also HNLIInclusive will throw a ConcurrentModificationException.

        NOTE: Changes to the underlying Vector that do not modify the size will simply not be detected. This is due to 'a bug' in the JDK implementation of AbstractList which keeps an integer-field named 'modCount' stored as 'protected' - and (unfortunately) unavailable to implementers of AbstractList (rendering it useless).

        ALSO: Any call made to a variant of the provided first(...) or last(...) methods will cause the internal int 'expected-size' field to reset. This would, therefore, prevent ConcurrentModificationException from throwing - even if code from outside the Iterator had modified the size of the underlying Vector.
        See Also:
        Util.Inclusive.subSectionOPT(Vector, int, int), TagNode.isClosing
        Code:
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         CHECK_CME();
        
         lastReturned    = hasPrevDP;
         hasNextDP       = hasPrevDP = null;
         modifiedSince   = false;
        
         if (lastReturned != null) return lastReturned;
        
         int LOOP_BOUNDARY = (minCursor == -1) ? 0 : minCursor;
        
         if (cursor == -1) cursor = LOOP_BOUNDARY; // Will throw exception
        
         while (--cursor >= LOOP_BOUNDARY)
             if ((lastReturned = TEST_CURSOR_INCLUSIVE()) != null)
                 return lastReturned;
        
         throw new NoSuchElementException("There are no more previous elements available.");
        
      • hasNext

        public boolean hasNext()
        Use this method to find out whether the underlying Vector and current cursor position would retrieve another match if 'next' or 'nextIndex' were called.
        Returns:
        This shall return TRUE if calling the next(), or nextIndex() methods would return another inclusive / sub-list match. This method shall return FALSE if calling 'next' would generate / throw a 'NoSuchElementException' - because there are no more sub-list matches in the underlying Vector, given the current cursor position.
        Throws:
        java.util.ConcurrentModificationException - Internal to this Iterator's state, there is a private int 'expectedSize' maintained. If modifications are made to the underlying vectorized-html, from outside of the add(...), set(...) or remove(...) variants provided by this interface then the value of this internal-field int 'expectedSize' will not be consistent with the actual size of the Vector. When this situation arises, both class HNLI and also HNLIInclusive will throw a ConcurrentModificationException.

        NOTE: Changes to the underlying Vector that do not modify the size will simply not be detected. This is due to 'a bug' in the JDK implementation of AbstractList which keeps an integer-field named 'modCount' stored as 'protected' - and (unfortunately) unavailable to implementers of AbstractList (rendering it useless).

        ALSO: Any call made to a variant of the provided first(...) or last(...) methods will cause the internal int 'expected-size' field to reset. This would, therefore, prevent ConcurrentModificationException from throwing - even if code from outside the Iterator had modified the size of the underlying Vector.
        See Also:
        AbstractHNLI.CHECK_CME(), Util.Inclusive.subSectionOPT(Vector, int, int), TagNode.isClosing, SubSection
        Code:
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         CHECK_CME();
        
         if (hasNextDP != null) return true;
        
         int LOOP_BOUNDARY = (maxCursor == -1) ? (v.size() - 1) : maxCursor;
        
         if (cursor == -1) cursor = (minCursor == -1) ? -1 : (minCursor-1);
        
         while (++cursor <= LOOP_BOUNDARY)
             if ((hasNextDP = TEST_CURSOR_INCLUSIVE()) != null) return true;
        
         return false;
        
      • next

        public java.util.Vector<HTMLNodenext()
        Returns the nearest node-match in the underlying Vector, given the current cursor position - when searching in the right-direction, or in the direction of increasing Vector-indices.
        Returns:
        This shall return the sub-list match that is directly next to the current cursor position.
        Throws:
        java.util.ConcurrentModificationException - Internal to this Iterator's state, there is a private int 'expectedSize' maintained. If modifications are made to the underlying vectorized-html, from outside of the add(...), set(...) or remove(...) variants provided by this interface then the value of this internal-field int 'expectedSize' will not be consistent with the actual size of the Vector. When this situation arises, both class HNLI and also HNLIInclusive will throw a ConcurrentModificationException.

        NOTE: Changes to the underlying Vector that do not modify the size will simply not be detected. This is due to 'a bug' in the JDK implementation of AbstractList which keeps an integer-field named 'modCount' stored as 'protected' - and (unfortunately) unavailable to implementers of AbstractList (rendering it useless).

        ALSO: Any call made to a variant of the provided first(...) or last(...) methods will cause the internal int 'expected-size' field to reset. This would, therefore, prevent ConcurrentModificationException from throwing - even if code from outside the Iterator had modified the size of the underlying Vector.
        java.util.NoSuchElementException - If there are not more matches, this exception shall throw. Avoid having to catch this exception by always calling method 'hasNext', and only invoking 'next' if that method returned TRUE.
        See Also:
        AbstractHNLI.CHECK_CME(), Util.Inclusive.subSectionOPT(Vector, int, int), TagNode.isClosing, SubSection
        Code:
        Exact Method Body:
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         return Util.cloneRange(v, nextDotPair());
        
      • nextDotPair

        public DotPair nextDotPair()
        This method, in-some-ways but-not-others, "overrides" the original ListIterator<E>.nextIndex() method. Since public class HNLIInclusive is an Iterator over "sub-lists" - not individual nodes - this means that whenever a Vector-index position is expected, the programmer should be expecting this Iterator to return two values: both a sub-list start-position, and also a sublist ending-Vector-position. This is the purpose of class DotPair - it allows pointers (indices) rather than copies of the nodes themselves to be saved, copied or evaluated.

        NOTE: Java's public int nextIndex() method requires that an integer be returned in order for this class to properly implement the public interface ListIterator<>. This method, however, is offered as a "better substitution for" the original 'nextIndex' method. The original nextIndex() method in the ancestor class ListIterator may still be used, but the actual intention (finding sublists matches in a vectorized-html webpage) could be misunderstood by a novice. Method next(), which is mandatory, will return an integer that points to the begin index of the next sub-list match, but will (obviously) leave off the ending-position of the next sub-list match. Remember that the concept behind the key-word "Inclusive" is that a Vector-sublist shall searched, found, and returned, not just the first HTML Element TagNode found.

        SUMMARY OF ISSUE: The method nextDotPair() returns a value that is more-exactly in-line with the notion of an HTML Node List Iterator than the method nextIndex(). The latter will return an integer index-pointer (into the underlying vectorized-HTML page-Vector) that identifies the first element of the next-match, but leave off completely information about where that sublist ends.
        Returns:
        The next integer-pointer pair to the starting-index and ending-index of the next "inclusive-sublist match" found on the vectorized-html webpage.
        Throws:
        java.util.ConcurrentModificationException - Internal to this Iterator's state, there is a private int 'expectedSize' maintained. If modifications are made to the underlying vectorized-html, from outside of the add(...), set(...) or remove(...) variants provided by this interface then the value of this internal-field int 'expectedSize' will not be consistent with the actual size of the Vector. When this situation arises, both class HNLI and also HNLIInclusive will throw a ConcurrentModificationException.

        NOTE: Changes to the underlying Vector that do not modify the size will simply not be detected. This is due to 'a bug' in the JDK implementation of AbstractList which keeps an integer-field named 'modCount' stored as 'protected' - and (unfortunately) unavailable to implementers of AbstractList (rendering it useless).

        ALSO: Any call made to a variant of the provided first(...) or last(...) methods will cause the internal int 'expected-size' field to reset. This would, therefore, prevent ConcurrentModificationException from throwing - even if code from outside the Iterator had modified the size of the underlying Vector.
        See Also:
        AbstractHNLI.CHECK_CME(), Util.Inclusive.subSectionOPT(Vector, int, int), TagNode.isClosing, SubSection
        Code:
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         CHECK_CME();
        
         lastReturned    = hasNextDP;
         hasNextDP       = hasPrevDP = null;
         modifiedSince   = false;
        
         if (lastReturned != null) return lastReturned;
        
         int LOOP_BOUNDARY = (maxCursor == -1) ? (v.size() - 1) : maxCursor;
        
         if (cursor == -1) cursor = (minCursor == -1) ? -1 : (minCursor-1);
        
         while (++cursor <= LOOP_BOUNDARY)
             if ((lastReturned = TEST_CURSOR_INCLUSIVE()) != null) return lastReturned;
        
         throw new NoSuchElementException("There are no more next elements available.");
        
      • firstDotPair

        public DotPair firstDotPair()
        This adds method public DotPair firstIDotPair() to the java public interface ListIterator<E>. This, actually, returns an instance of DotPair. Because this Iterator iterates Vector-sublists, not individual HTML nodes, the first-index of the first match will be a DotPair, not an integer. This (hopefully-obvious) is because the public class DotPair encapsulates two needed numbers (a Vector-position start-index, and an ending-index) into a single-data-class.

        NOTE: This method is somewhat of a "reset method" - because the internal-cursor is moved to the beginning of the underlying-Vector. Whenever the cursor is moved (or restricted), the logic that checks for a ConcurrentModificationException is reset.

        In normal situations, when statements or method's from outside the update methods in this class, modify the underlying html-Vector a ConcurrentModificationException shall throw. However, whenever an HTML Node List Iterator method moves the cursor, the logic for checking Concurrent Modification will reset (by setting the internal 'expectedSize' field to v.size()). This shall prevent an exception throw if outside modification of the underlying Vector has occurred.

        Methods from this class that move (or restrict) the cursor, include: first(), last(), firstIndex(), lastIndex(), moveCursor(...), and restrictCursor(...)
        Returns:
        Out of the entire vectorized-html webpage, this method resets the internal cursor, and returns the first 'DotPair' match - the starting-index and ending-index - of the first "inclusive-sublist match"
        See Also:
        nextDotPair(), lastDotPair()
        Code:
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         cursor          = 0;
         hasNextDP       = hasPrevDP = null;
        
         // Calls to first, last, firstIndex, or lastIndex "reset" the CME Monitor-Logic
         expectedSize    = v.size();
        
         return nextDotPair();
        
      • lastDotPair

        public DotPair lastDotPair()
        This does the same as firstIDotPair() but returns the last list match index-pair found within the input Vector.

        This adds method public DotPair lastIDotPair() to the java public interface ListIterator<E>. This, actually, returns an instance of DotPair. Because this Iterator iterates Vector-sublists, not individual HTML nodes, the last-index of the last match will be a 'DotPair' not an integer. This (hopefully obviously) is because the public class DotPair encapsulates two needed numbers (a Vector-position start-index, and an ending-index) into a single-data-class.

        NOTE: This method is somewhat of a "reset method" - because the internal-cursor is moved to the beginning of the underlying-Vector. Whenever the cursor is moved (or restricted), the logic that checks for a ConcurrentModificationException is reset.

        In normal situations, when statements or method's from outside the update methods in this class, modify the underlying html-Vector a ConcurrentModificationException shall throw. However, whenever an HTML Node List Iterator method moves the cursor, the logic for checking Concurrent Modification will reset (by setting the internal 'expectedSize' field to v.size()). This shall prevent an exception throw if outside modification of the underlying Vector has occurred.

        Methods from this class that move (or restrict) the cursor, include: first(), last(), firstIndex(), lastIndex(), moveCursor(...), and restrictCursor(...)
        Returns:
        Out of the entire vectorized-html webpage, this method resets the internal pointer, and returns the last 'DotPair' match - the starting-index and ending-index - of the last "inclusive-sublist match"
        See Also:
        previousDotPair(), firstDotPair()
        Code:
        Exact Method Body:
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         cursor          = v.size() - 1;
         hasNextDP       = hasPrevDP = null;
        
         // Calls to first, last, firstIndex, or lastIndex "reset" the CME Monitor-Logic
         expectedSize    = v.size();
        
         return previousDotPair();
        
      • first

        public java.util.Vector<HTMLNodefirst()
        This adds to the ListIterator<E> class by providing a first() method that resets this Iterator back to the first match that is found in the underlying html-Vector. The internal-cursor will be moved back to the beginning of the Vector.

        NOTE: If the underlying web-page Vector has been modified, then this method shall return the updated first match. There is no "match memory." Rather, if the underlying Vector changes, further calls to next(), previous(), first() and last() could also change.

        NOTE: This method is somewhat of a "reset method" - because the internal-cursor is moved to the beginning of the underlying-Vector. Whenever the cursor is moved (or restricted), the logic that checks for a ConcurrentModificationException is reset.

        In normal situations, when statements or method's from outside the update methods in this class, modify the underlying html-Vector a ConcurrentModificationException shall throw. However, whenever an HTML Node List Iterator method moves the cursor, the logic for checking Concurrent Modification will reset (by setting the internal 'expectedSize' field to v.size()). This shall prevent an exception throw if outside modification of the underlying Vector has occurred.

        Methods from this class that move (or restrict) the cursor, include: first(), last(), firstIndex(), lastIndex(), moveCursor(...), and restrictCursor(...)
        Returns:
        This returns the first "inclusive" sub-list (open-tag / start-tag up to the next close-tag) match as a vectorized-html sublist.
        See Also:
        next()
        Code:
        Exact Method Body:
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         cursor          = 0;
         hasNextDP       = hasPrevDP = null;
        
         // Calls to first, last, firstIndex, or lastIndex "reset" the CME Monitor-Logic
         expectedSize    = v.size();
        
         return next();
        
      • last

        public java.util.Vector<HTMLNodelast()
        This adds to the ListIterator<E> class by providing a last() method that moves this Iterator to the last match that is found in the underlying html-Vector. The internal-cursor will be moved directly to the end of the Vector.

        NOTE: If the underlying web-page Vector has been modified, then this method shall return the updated last match. There is no "match memory." Rather, if the underlying Vector changes, further calls to next(), previous(), first() and last() could also change.

        NOTE: This method is somewhat of a "reset method" - because the internal-cursor is moved to the beginning of the underlying-Vector. Whenever the cursor is moved (or restricted), the logic that checks for a ConcurrentModificationException is reset.

        In normal situations, when statements or method's from outside the update methods in this class, modify the underlying html-Vector a ConcurrentModificationException shall throw. However, whenever an HTML Node List Iterator method moves the cursor, the logic for checking Concurrent Modification will reset (by setting the internal 'expectedSize' field to v.size()). This shall prevent an exception throw if outside modification of the underlying Vector has occurred.

        Methods from this class that move (or restrict) the cursor, include: first(), last(), firstIndex(), lastIndex(), moveCursor(...), and restrictCursor(...)
        Returns:
        This returns the last "inclusive" sub-list (open-tag / start-tag up to the next close-tag) match as an vectorized-html sublist.
        See Also:
        previous()
        Code:
        Exact Method Body:
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         cursor          = v.size() - 1;
         hasNextDP       = hasPrevDP = null;
        
         // Calls to first, last, firstIndex, or lastIndex "reset" the CME Monitor-Logic
         expectedSize    = v.size();
        
         return previous();
        
      • previousIndex

        public int previousIndex()
        The veracity of using this method has been eclipsed by method public previoustDotPair(). Nothing problematic should happen, that is unless you forget that this Iterator is an 'inclusive' Iterator. The word "Inclusive" is intended to indicate that a 'range' or 'sublist' (demarcated by a 'start' and 'end' Vector-index pair) are involved. This is usually-but-not-always expressed using an instance of class 'DotPair'. The starting and ending indices are meant to point to HTML opening and closing element tags such as: <DIV> and </DIV>, or maybe <A> and </A>

        Because this method only returns a single integer, and that is the index of the previous opening HTML Tag matching the iterator's constraints (but leaves off the closing-tag) this method 'previousIndex()' may seem out of place.
        Returns:
        Returns the index of the beginning of the previous matched sub-section.
        Code:
        Exact Method Body:
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         return previousDotPair().start;
        
      • nextIndex

        public int nextIndex()
        The veracity of using this method has been eclipsed by method public nextDotPair() Nothing problematic should happen, that is unless you forget that this Iterator is an 'inclusive' Iterator. The word "Inclusive" is intended to indicate that a 'range' or 'sublist' (demarcated by a 'start' and 'end' Vector-index pair) are involved. This is usually-but-not-always expressed using an instance of class 'DotPair'. The starting and ending indices are meant to point to HTML opening and closing element tags such as: <DIV> and </DIV>, or maybe <A> and </A>

        Because this method only returns a single integer, and that is the index of the next opening HTML Tag matching the iterator's constraints (but leaves off the closing-tag) this method 'nextIndex()' may seem out of place.
        Returns:
        Returns the index of the beginning of the next matched sub-section.
        Code:
        Exact Method Body:
        1
         return nextDotPair().start;